TrueFire LIVE Broadcast Link

TrueFire LIVE Broadcast Link

Hey everybody!  I just finished a live broadcast for TrueFire tonight and wanted to share the link with you…  I’d like to send out a big thank you to everyone that tuned to the event and if you missed it, you can watch it anytime!  Please pass this along to your guitar friends!

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Kelly Richey TrueFire LIVE Broadcast Link

Kelly Richey About the Educator

Kelly Richey is one of the hardest-working independent musicians in the music business today. When it comes to touring, this Cincinnati-based blues rocker can truly claim the title “Queen of the Road Warriors.” The veteran guitar-slinger has covered the USA, Canada, Europe and Australia in her 30-year career. Fronting her blues/rock power trio, Kelly has played over 4,000 shows, logged a mind-boggling 1 million road miles (and counting) and released 16 albums on her private label, Sweet Lucy Records, earning her reputation as a master guitarist and singer/songwriter. This ain’t no polite, watered-down sound. It’s hardcore blues-rock on steroids, a blistering, in-your-face tour de force….>>>READ MORE

Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival

Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival –

Organized by LADD

Rock on Kelly Richey! A local Cincinnati rock star who also teaches guitar, Kelly has shared the stage with many legends, been listed among the top 100 gifted guitarists by the Truefire Community in 2011, and frequently draws comparisons to blues guitar icons Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. In 2009 she founded Powered by Intention coaching consultancy, and she is also president of Music4Change, a Cincinnati nonprofit committed to music education. Did we mention Kelly is also a talented writer? And, as a woman who has severe dyslexia, she considers her greatest accomplishment to be her becoming a facilitator for Women Writing for (a) Change.

In an interview in Good Things Going Around, she shared, “Had I not gravitated towards music and discovered books in audio form, I honestly don’t know what I would have done. My life would have turned out much differently, I’m sure. What I know now is that there is no cookie cutter mold to learning. I’m proof that even someone with severe dyslexia can learn to play a musical instrument….For many years having dyslexia negatively affected my self-esteem. It wasn’t until I was in my late 20’s that I began to realize I might actually be rather intelligent.”

Intelligent you are Kelly! #DifferentLikeYouCincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival, organized by LADD - Kelly Richey

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Guitar Student Takes Motorbike Tour

Guitar Student Takes Motorbike Tour

Below is a story of my guitar student from Turkey, named Ozkan:

We believe in the influence of dreams, and that dreams can come true…

That’s why we decided to get on the road instead of postponing our dreams.

For years our jobs have involved designing, planning,organizing and problem solving. Now, also putting these skills acquired in professional life in use, we want to transform what have been short getaways during paid vacations into a real adventure…

Ozkan Guitar StudentWe start rolling in South America, trace the Andes all the way down to Ushuaia, the southernmost town in the World.

We then head north and get to Buenos Aires after navigating through immense plains, cross the Plata River over to Montevideo, visit ever-exiciting Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro followed by the Iguazu Falls at the crosspoint of three nations before departing Brazil.

We then ride westward to tackle Atacama Desert and Uyuni Salt Flat and arrive to La Paz, the highest capital city of the World.

We visit Inca gem Cusco, climb the Cotopaxi in Ecuador and finish off the South America leg in Cartagena.

We then cross to Panama, hop through Central American nations one by one follow the traces of the Aztecs and the Incas in Mexico.

We enter the US at San Diego, follow the famous twisty roads of West Coast to San Francisco, cross Death Valley to reach the Grand Canyon, and then visit Yellowstone and Seattle.

We start the Canadian leg of the trip in Vancouver, visit the splendid lakes and national parks riding east and cap off the trip in New York after 9 months and 50 thousand kilometers.

Hi, I’m Kerem.

I’m a 37-year-old mechanical engineer with a master’s degree in industrial design.

While in college, I happened to visit Ecuador for two weeks through a series of fortunate events. I felt a real connection with that land and have always wanted to travel the rest of Ecuador and South America. So I learned Spanish after college.

I’ve been riding motorcycles for four years. It’s gradually taking up more space in my life.

I’ve had the opportunity to go on some long trips. First Turkey, then South Africa, Balkans, the Alps… And finally came the idea of doing this South American dream trip on a motorcycle. Now we want to realize this dream with my friends and get on the road.

I’ve been using social media quite heavily for the past five years and believe that social media is the best tool to share the sites,wonders and experiences that we’ll come across on this tour with others.

There is also a shorter version of the introduction video, only posted on Instagram….Please find its URL below:

If you’d like to see only the route we plan to cover please check below links of Instagram and Facebook……We lost the background music at Facebook because of copyright issues, unfortunately.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BLWeb90gIgs

https://www.facebook.com/GoMotoTrio/videos/343425862670859/

Hello I’m F?rat.

I’m a 36-year-old industrial designer. Despite working mostly on cars for 14 years, I’ve always been more interested in motorcycles. It’s such that when visiting automotive trade fairs for work, I always found myself on top the few motorcycles that were on display.

Finally I started riding six years ago after taking several advanced riding trainings, after which I always wanted to go on longer trips.

Since childhood, I’ve always fiddled with every camera I could get my hands on and clicked through many rolls of films.

Ever since we decided to go on this adventure, the idea of sharing this tour with our followers is really exciting to me.

Frankly, I can’t wait for the day we get on the road.

https://www.instagram.com/mototrio/

https://www.facebook.com/GoMotoTrio/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp9chGaTx4_k6zyrgWpkMog

Hi, I’m Özkan.

I’m a 40-year-old metallurgical and materials engineer. I’ve worked in construction and automotive sectors for 16 years in various positions. In the mean time, I completed an MBA program.

I’ve been trekking and have been interested in underwater sports since childhood. I’m a rescue diver. I’ve got acquainted with motorcycles 7 years ago. I’ve tried to developed my riding skills by taking control and advanced riding trainings.

Being out on the road and in nature with my tent has always been very appealing to me. I’ve been going on tours in and out of Turkey with this passion. I’m truly eager to go on this adventure with Kerem and F?rat.

*************************************************************

We know that many people share our passion for being on the road, discovering new places and getting to know diverse cultures.

What got us moving were the stories shared by others who got on the road before us.

We, too, will share our adventures with our followers on Turkish national press and social media.

We have teamed up to get on road and we invite you to participate in this adventure.

Whole Lotta Power Trio

Whole Lotta Power Trio
Riff Journal Article

There’s a Whole Lotta Power Trio going on!  Hi, I’m Kelly Richey and welcome to “Focus On Blues-Rock Power Trio”.  Many of today’s most popular guitar players like Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan, played in what’s called a “power trio”.  In this course we’re going to focus on the essential techniques and specific elements that are used when playing guitar in a blues-rock power trio.  We will look at rhythm and lead guitar techniques and how they overlap; working together seamlessly to create a powerful wall of sound.  I will also talk about the importance of creating musical “holes”, the power of creating space, and how to work with a drummer and bass player to create a unique sound that best supports your guitar style.
Riff Journal - Kelly Richey - TrueFire
I have separated this course into five sections. The first section will give you an overview of the history of three piece blues and blues-rock players that have influenced my style and my overall sound.  I’ll also talk about their individual rhythm sections and how a particular artists’ rhythm section played a key roll in his overall sound.

In the second section, I will show you the essential rhythm guitar techniques, chords and chord voicings, grooves, and riff-based rhythm patterns.

In the third section, we will look at ways to build a strong foundation and how to approach guitar solos; essential soloing techniques, how to build a bridge between lead and rhythm guitar, we will explore the importance of using dynamics, and how to build a rhythmic presence that entrains the listener.

In the fourth section, we will look at guitar tone, the use of effects, different amplifiers, speaker configuration so you have access to the sustain, texture and articulation desired to support your unique style.

And lastly, in the five section, will put all of these these essential techniques and concepts together into a series of performance studies.  So let’s dive in and get started!

Riff Journal

TrueFire Presents Kelly Richey: Focus On Blues Rock Power Trio

What you will learn:

– Power Trio Background Overview, History & Players
– Tones & Gear
– Power System for Visualizing the Neck of the Guitar
– Essential Rhythm Concepts:  Bar Chords & Power Chords, Embellishing Chord Progressions, Riff Based Song Approaches, Bridging Between Rhythm & Lead, Left & Right Hand Muting Techniques
– Essential Lead Guitar Soloing Concepts:  Pentatonic Scale Review, Punctuation & Dynamics, Hammer Ons & Pull Offs, Slides, Bends & Vibrato, Pinch Harmonics, Embellishing Solos, Flat Tire For Lead
– 4 Essential Blues and Blues/Rock Songs
– Rhythm Tracks
– Chord Charts and Tab Included


About Riff Journal
Free – Quarterly – No Ads

Give your guitar a rest for a few minutes and come Riff with us.

From the day we opened our doors here at TrueFire, we knew that our success as a music education software company hinged on one thing, and one thing only — the quality of our educators.

Sure, technology helps us practice smart and play hard, but that’s just icing on the cake. Pull back the curtain and the true wizards of TrueFire are revealed — 493 brilliant artists and educators!

Riff is our digital magazine, designed to celebrate TrueFire artists and educators. We’ll tell you stories about them, share exclusive lessons from them (even some of their scrapbook pics), and tickle your ears with their music. You’ll also be treated to a variety of music-centric features to stimulate your own creativity and musicality.

Riff is free to you (also free of advertising) and our way of saying thanks to you, our fellow guitar playing friends and students, for your support and loyalty over all these years — this Riff is for you!

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Guitars 4 Vets

Guitars 4 Vets

I spent Friday morning teaching guitar to vets at the VA hospital– what an honor!  We worked on fundamentals, building a strong foundation, and everyone is learning to play “Hey Joe”!  Music truly is a universal language.  The human connections that it builds continues to amaze me. (Guitars 4 Vets)

Music is a powerful bridge, one that’s often overlooked in society.  For the artist, music is a form of self expression.  For the listener, music is an invitation to connect and an opportunity to reflect.  I do believe that we are all artists and music in just one modality.

I often ask myself where I would be without music…?  It’s helped form the life that I live, the lessons I’ve learned, the people that I’ve met along the way.

Below are some photos from Friday’s session.  Please be sure to visit Guitars for Vets national website so you can learn about this program!guitars-for-vets-2

guitars-for-vets-1 guitars-for-vets-3

Guitars for Vets

Thousands of our war Veterans are afflicted with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). In fact, more soldiers have committed suicide since the Vietnam War than have died in actual battle. But many are finding hope in an unlikely place: behind the wood and strings of an acoustic guitar. The healing power of music helps soldiers cope. That’s why we provide veterans with guitars and a forum to learn how to play. But we can’t do it without your help. Please read on to learn more out about the program and how you can help those who served rediscover their joy through the power of music.guitars-for-vets-4

MORE THAN HALF OF THE 2.6 MILLION VETERANS FROM THE IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN WARS STRUGGLE WITH PHYSICAL AND MENTAL CHALLENGES, IN FACT, 22 VETERANS COMMIT SUICIDE EVERY DAY.guitars-for-vets-8

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Tips for Improving Your Guitar Skills

Tips for Improving Your Guitar Skills – Part Two

Here are some tips for improving your guitar skills – tips #4, #5 and #6 from “The Little Book of Talent” by Daniel Coyle.  This book contains 52 tips for improving your ability in any skill that you want to master.  Each tip in this series is a principle I practiced when learning how to play the guitar and in developing my skills as a writer. This is the second post in this series and I think you’ll find that it’s a source of real inspiration about the process of learning.

Tip #4 Buy a Notebook

Buy a notebook and write down your thoughts or results from today, ideas for tomorrow and goals for next week. As a songwriter and poet, I’ve learned the importance of capturing a creative moment or idea.  I’ve used a shoe box and collected stacks of single pages on napkins, posted notes, scratch paper etc. and one time I remember writing a poem on a pizza box.  Currently I find myself using my iPhone or iPad. I also like recording my song ideas via an app one my phone, so I can refer to them later.  Most of the songs on my last two CD’s came from old recordings I captured on my cassette recorder.  When the tapes were transferred to digital format, I ended up with over 72 hours of material from the 80’s and 90’s to pull from.

Sometimes ideas sit there collecting for years, but whether I ever use them or not, they’re there and I find that to be a comfort as an artist.

When we have an idea, we always think we’ll remember it and we don’t!  Half the time we don’t even remember having had the idea.  What really matters is that you write stuff down, capture it and reflect on it – thoughts from today and ideas for tomorrow. I consider it part of my life’s work. So much of our lives are formed through our observations, but what we write on or speak to is not important – it’s the doing of it!  A notebook works like a map – it creates clarity.

Tip #5 Be willing to be stupid.

Be willing to be stupid.  Accomplishing or improving at anything, (or pushing boundaries to see what’s possible), requires the building of new connections in our brain.  Building new connections requires us to reach, sometimes fail and – at times – look stupid.  If we’re not willing to risk feeling the emotional pain of making mistakes, we will get stuck, let go of dreams and compromise some of our deepest desires.

I don’t like looking stupid, but the things that were most important to me were things I tried many times, often failed miserably at, but through persistence, finally got right.  Had I known some things would be so hard, there’s no way I would have tried—it’s those things that I can honestly say were worth it!

Tip #6 – Choose Spartan over luxurious.

Choose Spartan over luxurious. I want to take time to address this properly.  Luxury is a motivational narcotic because it suggests that where we are is really comfortable and there’s no reason to push harder.  When we choose to be a little Spartan over surrounding ourselves with luxury, we keep putting in the effort to succeed. If a person has a burning desire to accomplish something, luxury and comfort are tough situations to overcome.  It’s been my experience that I did my best work when I was hungry.  With that said, I’ve often pushed too hard, missed out on life and found myself lacking balance. When that happens, everything I try to do suffers and relationships become stressed.  Life is all about balance, and achieving great things takes work.  It’s important to define and refine our goals and objectives – and to do so with a clear head.  Just as luxury is a narcotic, so is success.  Once either is achieved it can be hard to let go of and it’s easy to lose sight of what’s truly of value – those things you can’t buy and those things you cannot control. The concept of gratitude comes up for me here – the importance of remaining grateful.

Tips for Improving Your Guitar Skills - Kelly Richey - Scholle Images Photo by Scholle Images

tips #4, #5 and #6 from “The Little Book of Talent”, by Daniel Coyle.  52 Tips for Improving Your Skills, Week Two

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Guitars 4 Vets

Guitars For Vets

By: Richard Hutchinson

Guitars 4 Vets (G4V) is a national 501c (3) non-profit organization founded in 2007 in Milwaukee, WI.  There are currently chapters in over 50 VA Medical and Veteran Centers in 25 states, including Cincinnati and Cleveland in Ohio. The mission of G4V is to enhance the lives of injured and ailing veterans through the healing power of music. They provide free guitar lessons and a free guitar to vets in a structured program staffed by volunteers.  Participants are referred into the program by a care provider.  The program provides weekly private lessons that are individualized for the participant.   When the veteran completes the program they are given a guitar, gig-bag, strap, tuner, strings, picks, stand, method book, and a certificate of completion.  G4V has given over 20,000 free guitar lessons and distributed over 2,000 guitars to veterans since its inception. Monthly group lessons are also provided for past and current participants to provide an ongoing forum for veterans to continue their musical journey.  The purpose of the program is to promote positive social interaction, provide an avenue for self-expression, build focus and confidence, and create bonds of fellowship with other like-minded veterans. Veterans of course learn guitar skills along the way.

The weekly private guitar lessons provided by G4V are individualized and designed to help students learn at their own pace, while at the same time accommodating any physical/emotional challenges the veteran may have. The G4V group lessons help to create connections between individuals who are both veterans and guitar players.  This serves as a way to promote human interaction.  Veterans who regularly attend group sessions are able to build the confidence needed to pursue further creative empowerment and engagement with their community.

Guitars 4 VetsGuitars for Vets accepts guitars, playable or not. Donated guitars are either used as practice guitars or sold in order to raise funds for the program. Unrepairable guitars are turned into visual art through the G4V’s Art Strings program and sold at events.  Guitar donations are tax deductible.
You can make a tax deductible donation to G4V to help ensure they are able to continue to share the healing power of music with veterans across the country.  It costs about $200.00 per veteran for the guitar lessons and guitar they receive.  It’s a wonderful way to help our country’s heroes.
If you choose to donate, you can do so through their website, www.guitarsforvets.org.  You may also send a check made out to Guitars For Vets, Processing Center, 11933 W. Burleigh St. Wauwatosa, WI 53222.

Further you can contact them at 1-855-G4V-HERO /1-855-448-4376.

The national facebook page is: www.facebook.com/guitarsforvets

The Cincinnati Chapter contact information is:
Chapter Coordinator and Instructor: Richard Hutchinson
[email protected]  or 513-835-3496
Program Coordinator: Sonny Moorman
Instructors: Dick Buchholz and Bruce Kircher
Facebook: Guitars-for-Vets-Cincinnati
Reverbnation: Guitars 4 Vets Cincinnati

Tips for Improving Your Guitar Skills

Tips for Improving Your Guitar Skills – Part One

Here are some tips for improving your guitar skills– I recently read the book titled, “The Little Book of Talent”, by Daniel Coyle.  It was recommend to me by a guitar student in France. The book has 56 tips on developing your talents in the most effective way, and everything resonated with me deeply. Each tip was a principle I practiced myself when learning how to play the guitar. This is the first of a series of posts I’ll be making inspired by this book.

Tip #1 – Stare at the those you want to become.

When I first started playing, I watched everyone I could find who played the guitar. This was before cable TV and Youtube. I would stay up late and watch The Midnight Special. I’d go to the “midnight movie” each weekend to see movies like Woodstock and The Song Remains the Same. I hung out in music stores and talked to other guitar players. I had hundreds of posters and photos in collages on my bedroom walls.  I read all the latest music magazines and drew pictures of rock stars. All of these things may sound small, but they add up very quickly. I also practiced in front of a mirror 90% of my practice time. I was in touch with my identity as a guitar player and I watched intently what other players played, how they dressed, and how they acted.  Each of these small things provided powerful inspiration, and insight.

Tip #2 – Spend 15 minutes per day engraving the still in you brain.

I’ve taught for over 30 years and I ask my students to spend 20 minutes per day of intense focus time – and then play to have fun. There is nothing that replaces “work” on your instrument. I was 15 when I started, so I had the luxury of time, and I never wasted a minute of it. I had my systems and methods down. I knew that repetition was key, and I quickly saw that practice pay off. The more focus, the higher the programming of skills.

Tip #3 – Steal without apology.

Stealing without apology is an important tip, especially for a blues-rock guitarist. Nothing we do is new, it’s all repackaged but with our own fingerprint. I did my best to learn from the greatest guitarists that I could find. There are no two guitarists, musicians or artists who are alike. My entire style developed from what I picked up from great players AND through developing “workarounds” for the things I could not pull off.

Guitar Lessons By Kelly Richey Online Classroom

Kelly Richey - Tips for Improving Your Guitar Skills

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Whole Lotta Power Trio

Whole Lotta Power Trio

This Weeks Featured Series in Kelly Richey’s New Online Guitar Instruction Classroom

Focus On Power TrioHi, I’m Kelly Richey and welcome to “Focus On Blues-Rock Power Trio”.  Many of today’s most popular guitar players like Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan, played in what’s called a “power trio”.  In this course we’re going to focus on the essential techniques and specific elements that are used when playing guitar in a blues-rock power trio.  We will look at rhythm and lead guitar techniques and how they overlap; working together seamlessly to create a powerful wall of sound.  I will also talk about the importance of creating musical “holes”, the power of creating space, and how to work with a drummer and bass player to create a unique sound that best supports your guitar style.

I have separated this course into five sections. The first section will give you an overview of the history of three piece blues and blues-rock players that have influenced my style and my overall sound.  I’ll also talk about their individual rhythm sections and how a particular artists’ rhythm section played a key roll in his overall sound.

In the second section, I will show you the essential rhythm guitar techniques, chords and chord voicings, grooves, and riff-based rhythm patterns.Focus On: Blues-Rock Power Trio by Kelly Richey

Hi, I’m Kelly Richey and welcome to “Focus On Blues-Rock Power Trio”.  Many of today’s most popular guitar players like Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan, played in what’s called a “power trio”.  In this course we’re going to focus on the essential techniques and specific elements that are used when playing guitar in a blues-rock power trio.  We will look at rhythm and lead guitar techniques and how they overlap; working together seamlessly to create a powerful wall of sound.  I will also talk about the importance of creating musical “holes”, the power of creating space, and how to work with a drummer and bass player to create a unique sound that best supports your guitar style.

I have separated this course into five sections. The first section will give you an overview of the history of three piece blues and blues-rock players that have influenced my style and my overall sound.  I’ll also talk about their individual rhythm sections and how a particular artists’ rhythm section played a key roll in his overall sound.

In the second section, I will show you the essential rhythm guitar techniques, chords and chord voicings, grooves, and riff-based rhythm patterns.

In the third section, we will look at ways to build a strong foundation and how to approach guitar solos; essential soloing techniques, how to build a bridge between lead and rhythm guitar, we will explore the importance of using dynamics, and how to build a rhythmic presence that entrains the listener.

In the fourth section, we will look at guitar tone, the use of effects, different amplifiers, speaker configuration so you have access to the sustain, texture and articulation desired to support your unique style.

And lastly, in the five section, will put all of these these essential techniques and concepts together into a series of performance studies.

Be sure to check out this series in my new online classroom at: http://www.guitarlessonsbykellyrichey.com/

SECTION 1: History and Players

In this first section I give you an overview of the history and key players that have made up the landscape of the blues and blues-rock power trio’s that have influenced my style… and the styles of so many other players. Players like Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Eddie Van Halen, Billy Gibbons, Joe Walsh, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Roy Buchanan, Jeff Beck and Alex Lifeson.  I’ll talk a little bit about their individual rhythm sections and how their rhythm section influenced and supported the way they played guitar.  I will also talk about their guitar selection, over-all tone, and the gear used to create some of the most amazing guitar sounds we have to learn from.  So let’s get started!

SECTION 2: Essential Rhythm Guitar Concepts

In this section we will cover essential rhythm guitar techniques, chords and chord voicings, grooves, and riff based rhythm patterns.

– Bar Chords vs. Power Chords, Basic Barre Chords and Substitutions – Major, Minor, 7th, 7#9 & 9th Chords
– Left and right hand muting techniques, Funky Feel vs. Flat Tire Feel, Creating  Chord & Riff Based Rhythmic Patterns & Grooves
– How to incorporate Muting Techniques and Volume Dynamics for greatest impact
– Techniques that build a bridge between lead and rhythm guitar and rhythm and riff based groove patterns

SECTION 3: Soloing Concepts

How to approach guitar solos in a power trio; essential soloing techniques, how to build a bridge between lead and rhythm guitar, we will explore the importance of using dynamics, and how to build a rhythmic presence that pulls in the listener.  We will learn essential soloing techniques like bends, vibrato, hammer ons, pull offs, pinch harmonics, left and right hand muting for a funky approach or when used with a shuffle for what I call a “flat tire” approach.  We’ll look at octaves, rakes, slurs, pedal tones, single note articulation and punctuation,  feedback and sustain, and the importance of strong dynamics and finally, the figure eight strumming pattern.

SECTION 4:Guitar & Rig

We will discuss guitar tone, the proper use of effects, different amplifiers, speaker configuration so you have access to the sustain, texture and articulation desired to support the development of your own unique style.  I will talk about how the elements of sound creation empact your playing and ability to perform with the power and confdence needed to find your own voice.

SECTION 5: Performance Studies

These performance studies are designed to help you see examples of as many of the essential lead and rhythm concepts, guitar influences, and guitar setup and sound creation for you greatest learning experience.

Love – Kelly Richey
Whole Lotta Power Trio – Zed Zeppelin Guitar Concepts
You Wanna Rock – Kelly Richey
All Along The Watchtower – Jimi Hendrix Guitar Concepts

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Kelly Richey’s guitar instruction is like nothing you’ve seen before. Take lessons in the comfort of your own home. Get unlimited access to a library of over 250 instructional videos that you can watch anytime you want, as many times as you want. My lesson plans are tailored to meet your needs and guide you to mastering your guitar, faster than you ever thought possible. Starting at less than $20 a month, this is an incredible value.

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Kelly Richey’s Main Guitar Influences

Kelly Richey’s Main Guitar Influences

History and Players Overview:

Kelly Richey’s Main Guitar Influences featured in “Focus On: Blues Rock Power Trio” Series:
I give you an overview of the history and key players that have made up the landscape of the blues and blues-rock power trio’s that have influenced my style… and the styles of so many other players. Players like Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Eddie Van Halen, Billy Gibbons, Joe Walsh, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Roy Buchanan, Jeff Beck and Alex Lifeson.  I’ll talk a little bit about their individual rhythm sections and how their rhythm section influenced and supported the way they played guitar.  I will also talk about their guitar selection, over-all tone, and the gear used to create some of the most amazing guitar sounds we have to learn from.  So let’s get started!

Main Guitar Influences:

Jimi Hendrix was my first influence and from him I learned the importance of sustain, delay, distortion, tube amps, speaker configuration, delays and the use of other effects for live performance and recording.  Billy Gibbons taught me articulation, tone, precision and how to be an essential part of a three-piece rhythm generating machine.  Led Zeppelin opened the door to power chords, riff driven, groove based rhythms and leads; the importance of creating musical space, articulation, speed, and also some chaos with a method to the madness as they joined both rhythmically— with a form of syncopation I’d never experienced.

Led Zeppelin – Whole Lotta Love (Live Video):

Eric Clapton and Cream Live was where I learned to jam with others and interact in a more tightly woven connection with a band, allowing a more complicated drummer approach to be my foundation rather than something I had to play to (or with).  Eddie Van Halen took everything I had learned about simplicity and added a layer of technical ability that no one had ever seen.  I was heavily influenced by Eddie’s guitar tone and loved how Eddie Kramer mixed his guitar panned hard to one side in the mix while adding reverb panned hard to the opposite side, so a single guitar track sounded like you were in a stadium.  This was a drastic departure from the psychedelic sound of the 1960’s and early 1970’s guitar sound.  I never did a lot of tapping like Eddie, but I did begin to pull in pinch harmonics like I first discovered being used by Billy Gibbons.

Eric Clapton with Cream – Crossroads:


Another big influence was Joe Walsh and the James Gang. For instance, Funk #49, a powerful riff-driven song with a groove that pulled from blues, rock, and funk. Then came SRV and I found myself getting back to the basics of guitar tone and eventually learned that tone started in your hands and on the neck of your guitar; from there the sound is amplified, not the inverse.

SRV had the biggest overall impact on my playing by influencing my right hand.  By the time SRV hit the scene I had developed all the speed I was going to develop and his right hand technique helped me take my playing to a whole new level by adding a left and right hand muting technique for either a funky sound or a “flat tire” approach when playing with a shuffle.  SRV’s ability to bend strings, command righteous tone out of each and every note of his guitar was something that sent me on a quest for the perfect tone, maximum amount of sustain, and overall groove that would rock people to the edge of their chairs.  His ability to emote drew me in.

And then there as Roy Buchanan, quite possibly my favorite guitar player.  I saw Roy play live three times and all three times he played as a three piece.  Roy played with emotion and precision I’d never experienced, and he raised the bar even higher in my search of taking a “journey” with my guitar and creating a conversation with music alone.

Jeff Beck Wired and Blow by Blow was woven in along the way, showing me an example of a player that used his fingers instead of a pick.  Jeff also used his whammy bar differently than any other guitarist I’d seen.  Frank Marino and Mahogany Rush sprinkled in influence, as well…. and I almost forgot, Alex Lifeson of RUSH.

 

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Powerful Women in the Blues: Bonnie Raitt and Sister Rosetta Tharpe

When someone asks you to name legendary blues guitarists, the first names you reach for are probably men: Buddy Guy, the three Kings (Freddie King, B.B. King, Albert King), Muddy Waters. Maybe you’d throw in some blues-rockers like Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Jimi Hendrix. And you wouldn’t be wrong. I consider all of these musicians among my influences.

Women have long been in the blues, just not as much in the spotlight. So I’d like to take a moment and pay tribute to some of the women who paved the way before me. Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Bonnie Raitt are two of the most powerful female influences on my career as a blues rock guitarist.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

I’d always heard of Sister Rosetta Tharpe, but it wasn’t until recently that I really dove in and watched footage of her on YouTube. I had no idea how powerful she was, especially for the time during which she was playing.

The daughter of a female preacher, Rosetta’s roots were in gospel music. She was playing guitar as early as the age of six, touring with her family to spread the word of God. As one of the few prominent female black guitarists out there in the 1930s, she was a head-turner. She became a recording artist at the age of 23 and found success practically overnight. One song in particular, “Rock Me,” would go on to establish her as “The Godmother of Rock & Roll.” She was a huge influence on many early rock & roll artists like Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry.

Given the lineage of guitarists who learned from her, Rosetta Tharpe was influencing me before I even knew it. Electric-guitar-playing women are still a rarity in the music industry today. The fact that we have blues-rock at all can be attributed, at least in part, to Rosetta’s early trailblazing. Despite her achievements and undeniable influence on the history of rock & roll, Rosetta Tharpe has somehow escaped the attention of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

I discovered this great four-part documentary series that I would recommend to anyone who wants to know more about this legendary blues woman.

Bonnie Raitt

Bonnie Raitt is more of a household name than Rosetta Tharpe. This is largely thanks to her sweeping the Grammys in 1990. She’d been making music for about 20 years by then, but her 1989 album Nick of Time (“my first sober album,” she said) finally earned her commercial success. You probably know her hit single “Something to Talk About,” or at least are familiar with her signature red hair with a silver streak. Unlike Rosetta, Bonnie Raitt did get a spot in the Hall of Fame in 2000.

One of the earlier records I ever owned was Bonnie Raitt’s, and I remember how I loved her voice and the way she played slide guitar. But back then, I couldn’t fully appreciate just how good of a guitarist she was. She’s very smooth. Her guitar just wraps around a song. Bonnie is, of course, a world-class singer. But I think a lot of people miss just how brilliant she is as a guitarist. I can’t say enough about her.

These days, in addition to releasing her seventeenth studio album, Bonnie Raitt is lending her influence to charitable causes. In this interview from 1996 she discusses, among other things, the birth of the Bonnie Raitt Guitar Project with Boys & Girls Club of America. Her more recent charitable work, including social activism and environmental causes, is detailed on her website.

Women in the blues are a force to be reckoned with.

If it weren’t for the hard work of women like Rosetta Tharpe and Bonnie Raitt, I wouldn’t be where I am today, wouldn’t be playing the guitar the way I am today. It’s a privilege to even be in the same category as either of them and an honor to carry on their lineage.


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Front and Center: Blues Guitarist and The Kelly Richey Band Frontwoman, Kelly Richey

Front and Center: Blues Guitarist and The Kelly Richey Band Frontwoman, Kelly Richey

The WiMN’s Front and Center is a weekly column that showcases accomplished women who work in the music and audio industries. We spotlight successful female performers, manufacturers, retailers, educators, managers, publicists, and everyone else in between. Want to be featured? Learn how here

Front and Center: Blues Guitarist and The Kelly Richey Band Frontwoman, Kelly Richey

Kelly-Richey-Band_Hi-Res_Photo-by-Sonya-Ziegler

By Pauline France

There’s only one person we know of that’s been described as “Stevie Ray Vaughan trapped in a woman’s body with Janis Joplin screaming to get out,” and that’s the one-and-only Kelly Richey.

With over 30 years of experience as a professional independent touring musician, Richey fronts her power trio The Kelly Richey Band, has an unparalleled zeal for guitar, has taught more than 1000 guitar students, owns her record label company, is a certified life coach, is a record producer, and more. Simply said, she’s an all around bona fide bad-ass.

You have to see it to believe it, so head on over to her website to watch videos and more  at www.kellyrichey.com.

WiMN: Wow, first of all congrats on all of your achievements, album releases, and jam-packed tour schedule. Tell us about your two most recent albums The Kelly Richey Band Live at the Blue Wisp, and  Sweet Spirit. What makes them different from the 13 previous albums you’ve released?

KR: Sweet Spirit was recorded in Lexington, Ky., at Shangri-la Productions, produced and engineered by Duane Lundy. The Shangri-La Studio is a large warehouse with an amazingly cool vibe. We set up so we could record live and capture the raw energy I’m known for when I play live on stage.

This is the first studio release that I’ve recorded that truly captured the energy of a live performance giving us the ability to place our focus on arrangement and capturing the best live take. I was joined by funk master Freekbass and Robby Cosenza on drums. Originally I had written and recorded all the material in my home studio playing to just a drum loop. I was heavily influenced by Jack White and the Black Keys at this time, so I wanted to write to just a drum groove so I’d be forced to create guitar riffs and grooves that could stand alone. Once in the studio with Freekbass and Robby, Duane directed traffic and the result was a CD packed full of raw energy and the strongest collection of songs I’ve written to date.

The Kelly Richey Band Live at the Blue Wisp was recorded in Cincinnati, which is home-base for the Kelly Richey Band. With the release of Sweet Spirit, Freekbass and I joined forces live and began to tour in early 2013. This live CD is a reflection of the chemistry created during a years’ worth of non-stop touring during which the songs from Sweet Spirit were allowed to be opened up and develop a new life of their own– which only comes from playing live night after night.

Big Bamn joined forces with the band after touring with Bootsy Collins– consequently, Freekbass (a Bootsy Collins protégé) and Bamn are a force to be reckoned with musically. I’ve always wanted to have my energy matched on stage, and the two of them never fail!  This recording really captures the heart and soul of the band and is an accurate reflection of who we are: a powerful blues/rock power trio with a heavy funk and jam band influence.

WiMN: What was it that made you decide, “OK, I want to start my own record label”?

KR: Starting my own record label happened out of necessity. I was starting to tour and make records and needed distribution. At the time, the independent music concept was the new landscape. This, coupled by the fact that I’d been in a band that was signed to a major label and hence witnessed the cold, harsh reality that there is no guarantee in the music industry, made me choose the path that I felt best insured taking care of my own interests.

WiMN: What advice would you give to someone seeking to start their own record label?

KR: It really comes down to having enough motivation, cash flow, and business sense to record, release and promote your own product vs. having someone do that for you. There are absolute advantages to both! If someone else is going to sign you, you need to make sure they have the funding and the support you need, and that you do not become lost amongst their other artists. If you’re going to do it on your own, it’s a full-time job and you must function like a business!

WiMN: You’ve pretty much touched every aspect of being a guitarist: you’ve toured, taught, composed, produced, recorded and more. Of all the different aspects of guitar playing, which is your favorite and why?

KR: I’m torn between being on stage performing versus teaching people to play the guitar. I enjoy both a great deal and if forced to choose between the two, I would not be able to give up either!

WiMN: Tell us one of your biggest guitar student success stories.

KR: I’ve had many success stories along the way but this is the most recent. In early Nov. 2013, Diana Rein Polacek joined the world’s largest online guitar instruction school www.TrueFire.com and signed up to take guitar lessons from me.

I’ve been an instructor at Truefire for about a year now, and I very much like the instructional and teaching platform it presents for both students and teachers alike. After about six months of guitar instruction from me, Diana found a site called Giveit100, a place for people who have a passion that they want to excel at via sharing a short video of their progress every day for 100 days. Diana decided to take up the challenge and apply it to her guitar playing.

Diana picked one of my songs, “Mean Old World” to learn as the focus of her daily videos.  After just three weeks, here’s the process Diana has made. Quite frankly, I’m blown away by her committment  and dedication! I hope everyone takes a minute to watch some of these videos, as they are truly inspiring and clearly show the impact of what a dedicated practice routine can do to elevate one’s playing ability. No matter what you want to accomplish, it’s always done one step at a time, and here is an excellent example of someone doing just that with passion and determination. Kudos to Diane for all of her hard work! 

WiMN: You released an instructional DVD titled Blues: On Steroids. What can students expect to learn?

KR: Note: These video instruction packages allow students immediate access to over 120 of my instructional videos, support tab and instruction manuals, PDF files, and MP3 Rhythm Tracks, and are only available online.  The Blues On Steroids videos can be used as a stand-alone instructional series, or they can be used as support materials when taking one-on-one guitar lessons with me via real-time video Skype. The video guitar instruction packages allow students at any level to move at their own pace while taking lessons from me from anywhere in the world. Individual lessons as well as lesson packages are available.

Here is a link to a full description of each product:  https://kellyrichey.com/blues-steroids/.

WiMN: You’re also a life coach. Tell us a bit about that.

KR: People often come to me because they see that I followed my dreams and carved out a career path that supported my greatest passions. After teaching guitar one-on-one and group workshops for over 25 years, in 2008, I began a journey to pursue life coaching certifications to expand my offerings. My coaching consultancy is designed to educate, motivate, and inspire people to identify their life’s true purpose and consequently, achieve the life of their dreams.

In addition to life coaching, I also offer music business consulting— expertise that I’ve honed from over three decades of being a performing independent musician. Here are a list of my certifications outside of my music business experience: Certified True Purpose Coach®, Certified Dream Coach®, Certified Dream Coach Group Leader®, and I’m also trained in voice dialog.

WiMN: Your playing style has been compared to Stevie Ray Vaughan’s (NICE!). What does it feel like to be compared to such a huge maestro?

KR: It’s a compliment I do not take lightly! As an artist I do not feel like I could ever fill his shoes, so compliments like this inspire me to push forward as a guitarist, performer, and as an artist—  in ways that hopefully honor the legacy he left behind.

WiMN: What would you tell a young girl aspiring to succeed as a blues guitarist?

KR: You can do it!  Find a great teacher, practice every chance you get, work hard and seek mentors along the way! Most, believe in yourself 100%…!

WiMN: Share any exciting news lined up for the future.

KR: I’m working hard to build my online guitar instruction platform so that I can connect with as many guitar students as possible! I tour year-round but the vast majority of my dates are on weekends, so this allows me the freedom to teach and build a strong connection with my students during my off time.

I’m excited to announce that I recently shot my first guitar instruction series for TrueFire Online, the leading online guitar instruction classroom! This video series will be released in late fall/early winter and will further build my presence on Truefire’s powerful teaching platform (http://truefire.com/classrooms/sherpa_class.html?room=kellyrichey).

I had such a great time last spring opening solo for Robben Ford (who also just happens to be one of my guitar idols), that I have decided to do more solo shows and recording.  I have added a looper to my pedal board that allows me to create a backing track when I play. I can use that playing solo or with the band. My next solo show will be opening for the British band Wishbone Ash, in Mishawaka, Ind., (near South Bend) on Sunday, Sept. 14.

Wishbone Ash pioneered the harmony twin lead guitars format, so I am psyched to see that live!  I’m currently writing songs for my solo show, which I plan to record into a 4-song EP in Dec. I will continue to play with other musicians and to record with them, but for the moment I am enjoying going out on a limb and expanding my live performance and fostering my creative journey.

I’m booking festivals for 2015!  After much touring success and many festivals in new markets in the USA, Canada (and this October I will add Australia to the list), I’m actively booking dates for next year. I plan to perform with my band, perfrom solo, and also teach guitar instruction workshops. I look forward to what the new year brings!

Blues Bytes Magazine

Blues Bytes Magazine

Shakedown Soul CD Review

One good thing about Kelly Richey, certainly not the only good thing, is that she rarely stays in the same place musically for very long. For her 16th and latest release, Shakedown Soul (Sweet Lucy Records), the singer/guitarist retains her usual exemplary guitar, songwriting, and vocal talents, but her usual mix of blues and rock n’ roll is enhanced with the addition of horns, DJ scratching and drum loops, and strings and synthesizers.

Shakedown Soul - Cover squareWhile Richey adds the extra bells and whistles to this new album, she doesn’t lean on it, like so many artists did years ago. Instead, it amplifies and broadens her sound to powerful effect on several tracks, like the feisty “You Wanna Rock,” “Only Going Up,” and “I Want To Run,” or the funky workouts “Lies” and “Love.” Richey’s songwriting skills are front and center on a trio of strong tunes, “The Artist In Me,” “Afraid To Die,” and “Just Like A River.”

Reportedly, Richey told producer Tobe “Tobiotus” Donohoe and bass player Rikk Manning, “You make me cool and you make me relevant and I’ll make you rock!” Donohoe, who played drums, synths, and did all of the sequencing, and Manning, who plays some monster bass on the album, more than hold up their end of the deal. As for Richey, the lady can’t help but rock …… she’s been doing it for 35 years now and is as cool and relevant as she’s ever been.

Shakedown Soul ranks as Kelly Richey’s best work to date. If you’re not familiar with her talents, this is a fine place to get started.

— Graham Clarke

A Night Of CINspiration

A Night Of CINspiration

Kelly Richey to speak at a Night Of CINspiration

As a musician, Deer Park resident, Kelly Richey, has shared the stage with many music legends and been counted among the top 100 gifted guitarists by the Truefire Community. She candidly shares her journey as a person who has dyslexia and ADHD, and how those disabilities impacted her determination and success, and desire to help others succeed.

Kelly Richey_banner_14_headshotRichey will be sharing her story at A Night of CINspiration on April 27, 2016 from 5:30 to 7:30 pm at Tavern on the Hill in Mt. Adams. Admission is FREE with specials on drinks and food; however, Pre-Registration is requested at www.GoodThingsGoingAround.com.

A Night of CINspiration are happy hour get-togethers organized by Lisa Desatnik and her blog Good Things Going Around with a twist – the events are meant to be opportunities for people to meet and be uplifted by other positive thinking people, from diverse backgrounds. Speakers at each event are people who have been featured in Desatnik’s blog. Desatnik’s vision with her blog is to for it to inspire people to see, do and feel the GOOD that is all around and within them.

Richey has been described as “Stevie Ray Vaughan trapped in a woman’s body with Janis Joplin screaming to get out”. Having shared the stage with many legends, she has been listed as among the top 100 gifted guitarists by the Truefire Community in 2011, and frequently draws comparisons to blues guitar icons Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. She is also founder of Powered By Intention, a coaching consultancy; and is president of Music4Change, Inc. a Cincinnati nonprofit organization committed to music education in today’s schools as a vehicle for human expression, cultural understanding, and academic achievement. And, adding to her plate, she is a gifted writer and shares her talent as a facilitator for another nonprofit called Women Writing for a Change.

WWFC Women Writing for (a) Chance

Leila Kubesch, founder of nonprofit Parents 2 Partners and an advocate for the most vulnerable, will be the other featured speaker at the April 27 event. Kubesch is someone who lives her life with purpose, and pushes beyond her comfort zone because the power of what she is fighting for is much stronger than any insecurity inside herslef. She is a courageous leader making this world better in her own way. Kubesch is the founder of a Cincinnati nonprofit organization called Parents 2 Partners that educates and empowers vulnerable families including those with limited English, aged out and homeless youth from foster care. She has shared her message before a sellout crowd of TEDxCincinnati, and won a local Toastmasters competition. Kubesch encourages others to dream big and challenge themselves.

Good Things Going Around founder and publisher, Lisa Desatnik is a public relations/communications contractor and also does pet training and pet behavior consulting. Of her reasons for developing Good Things Going Around, she said, “Writing has always been a way I have expressed myself, since I was very young. Like everyone, I have had my share of challenges to overcome in my life. I have also been so fortunate to have had (and continue to have) some incredible parents, mentors, friends and role models whose examples, encouragement, and support have helped me to grow through those experiences. My life, and the people who have been a part of it, has opened my eyes and my heart to appreciate all of it. It has given me empathy and compassion for others in their own circumstances. It has given me cause to understand that it is among the most basic of human needs, to be included and appreciated. And it has taught me the importance of stepping out of my comfort zone at times to pursue my passions. It is my hope that my blog will be a source of inspiration and encouragement to followers in all of these areas.”

Rockin’ The House

Rockin’ The House

This past Saturday, I was honored to play a house concert at the beautiful home of Jay and Cheri Brandt.  Their home is in the country, near Rabbit Hash, Kentucky.  It’s so rural, in fact, there’s no cell signal the last mile of the drive.  The house was packed with new friends and loyal fans.  One of my dear friends, Cliff York (of York Vision in Cincinnati) introduced me to the Brandt’s earlier this year (Sonya and I thank you for the awesome home cooked vegan meal!) and we set the date.

The house concert scene is a growing phenomena throughout the USA, Canada, and Europe.  I was recently accepted into “Concerts In Your Home” an online community that pairs musicians and people interested in hosted house concerts.  CIYH has a heavy vetting process for musicians with very strict criteria.  Many people have asked me, “What’s a house concert?”  Well, it’s exactly what it sounds like… it’s a concert in your own home!

Kelly Richey House Concert

Now, anyone can throw a party and ask a musician to come play music, but this is much more that that.  This is an “event”.  An event where an artist sets the stage, people come to hear music, and the audience is there to listen!  People bring food and beverages, and typically there’s an hour before the show to meet and greet everyone, eat some food– and once everyone is settled in their seats, the music begins.  This allows an artist to have a fully captive audience, perform in an intimate setting, play music, tell personal stories, and when the music is over, the party continues!

Saturday night the house was packed full of interesting people who love music and I performed my electric solo show.  People were dancing– and all but swinging from the rafters by the second set!  Many people have questioned if my show is appropriate for someone’s home– yes it is!  LOL!  I use my full guitar rig AKA “spaceship” and two small amps.  I play according to the size of the room and to the mood of the room.  I play an acoustic set in the middle and can lean more towards acoustic the entire set if needed.

Kelly Richey House Concert

 
Most artists that play the House Concert market are all acoustic, and I can certainly do that; but I have the added advantage of offering both acoustic and electric performances.  And I have more funny/interesting stories than I could ever begin to tell; and I have more music to offer than I could ever begin to cycle through.  For me– short of playing a big festival, this is the absolute best modality an artist could ask for.  It’s an amazing feeling to step onto a big stage in front of thousands of people– there’s nothing like it!  I’ve had my share of wonderful performances while playing in clubs and music venues, but throughout the years there’s been a sense of separation.  I’m a people person, and with the amount of touring that I’ve done, I’ve seldom had the opportunity to get to know many of my fans.  This has always felt a bit empty.  We drive like crazy to get to the venue, hit the hotel, run to the club for soundcheck, eat what dinner we could find, hit the stage, head to the merchandise table, and back to the hotel.  Not that I don’t love my job, but house concerts offer so much more in terms of really engaging with my audience.

Kelly Richey House Concert

I’m excited and inspired to create a solo performance that allows me to stretch my wings as an artist and come in for a landing to meet my band on the other side.

If this sounds like something you’d be interested in doing, please feel free to email me and we’ll discuss the possibility of me coming to your home for a house concert.  Here’s a video put together by the “Concerts In Your Home” community.  The video explains the concept thoroughly.

Kelly Richey Rockin’ the house!!!

Rant ‘N’ Roll

Rant ‘N’ Roll

The Aquarian
By Mike Greenblatt

TRANSCENDING BLUES AND TANGO

In 1994, guitar-slinging singer/songwriter Kelly Richey dropped her Sister’s Gotta Problem debut and followed it up in ’95 with The Blues Don’t Lie. In the 20 years since, she’s put out 13 more blues-belting barn-stormers that accentuate her husky alto voice, filled with the kind of swagger usually reserved for men (or Bonnie Raitt). In 2014, Live At The Blue Wisp was but a mere blip on the way to this: Shakedown Soul (Sweet Lucy Records), an album so convincingly original and stunningly transcendent that it takes her bread’n’butter blues to extremes.

How so, you may ask.

This ain’t your daddy’s blues album. Her experimental side—aided and abetted by producer/drummer Tobe Donahue—has resulted in something so wide-reaching, it can only be described in terms of what other artists in other genres have done with progressive producers. Think how Daniel Lanois elevated the game of Emmylou Harris on her brilliant Wrecking Ball. It wasn’t exactly country but used country as a base. Richey uses blues as her base but considering the drum loops, hip-hop scratch, horns, keyboards, strings and synthesized sequencing, all in service to her growly late night bar-room voice, the blues comes out another animal.

Think Chrissie Hynde, Sheryl Crow, Janis (of course), Big Mama Thornton, Susan Tedeschi (before she met Derek Trucks) or even Bettye Lavette. Rock’n’roll, electronica, blues, folk and gospel all get their due. Emmlou isn’t the only country analogy here. The wildly experimental side also could be akin to the kind of career Jack White has put together or what Ryan Adams originally did in Whiskeytown. There’s no end to the possibilities here.

She’s logged over 800,000 miles to play over 3,700 shows. Her touring band is just drummer Donohue and bassist Rikk Manning, two bulls in a china shop. Their wall of sound is one thing but add the kind of studio outrageousness they prefer and you have one wild soiree of the highest order. Her last studio album, 2013’s Sweet Spirit, in no way prepares one for this onslaught.

I’m partial to the closing track. “Fading” is the only piece of acoustic loveliness on the CD, her deeply bent voice pleading and beseeching within a miasma of mysterioso and atmospheric clouds of sound.

You want nothin’ but the blues? Go somewhere else. This thing reaches.

Aquarian weekly Kelly Richey

Photo by Sonya Ziegler

Reflections In Blue – Bill Wilson CD Review

Reflections In Blue – Bill Wilson CD Review

Kelly Richey
Shakedown Soul
Sweet Lucy Records KRB 1143

Shakedown Soul - Cover squareThis one is for the diehard blues/rocker…straight-ahead, no apologies, in your face hard core rock with blues undertones throughout.  This band knows the blues from the roots up but has a love for the hardcore rock aspect.  Richey has been around the block a time or two and plays it like she feels it.  This is Richey’s 16th album in the course of her 35 years as a singer/songwriter and guitar slinger, known for her fiery style and devil may care attitude.  Where Kelly is concerned, it is straight-ahead, what you see is what you get.  Her songs are based on life experience that has had its share of ups and downs, with nothing in between…or so it seems.  This is a woman who lives hard and plays hard.  She is backed by a band that shares her view every step of the way.  With Rikk Manning on bass, Tobe “Tobotius” Donohue on drums & percussion and Lee Carroll on keys they have all their bases covered.  They get an assist on various cuts from Robby Cosenza on drums and percussion and Blake Cox on bass, as needed.  More than Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy, I hear influences from Jimi Hendrix and perhaps even a bit of Black Sabbath and the like here and there.  Whether it’s the style I prefer or not, no one can argue with Kelly’s talents where guitar is concerned…and her vocals have the sound of one who has seen a life spent in barrooms and pool halls.  Call it hardcore if you like, this has the sound of life lived on the dark side of town.  There’s no pretty “Pollyanna” stuff here…just life on life’s term, and we all know that it is not always pretty.  Think what you will, Kelly Richey is here to stay. — Bill Wilson

Riff Magazine

Riff Magazine

The new copy of Riff Journal just came out and I’m honored to be a featured artist this issue! I’d like to thank the TrueFire team for including me– Jeff Scheetz, for writing the article, Alison Hasbach, for the great photos, and Brad Wendkos for running such a cool organization!  YOU guys ROCK!!!

Check out the magazine– the article is on page 34. Enjoy!

Kelly Richey Riff Journal - TrueFire

Here’s the Q & A the article was written from– thank you Jeff Scheetz!

How old were you when you started playing guitar?

I started playing guitar when I was 15 years old.

Did you play anything else before or since?

I grew up playing piano.  My mother was classically trained, so there was always a piano in our living room.  I started taking weekly piano lessons when I was 5 or 6 years old and continued through 7th grade.

My next door neighbor had a set of drums I used to play, and one day he offered to let me borrow them so I could play them at my house instead of his. Yay!  Then, one day my Dad said to me, “Kelly, if you quit playing those drums I’ll buy you whatever you want!”  So, that’s when I got my first guitar!

You tour a lot – what is it about touring that you like – that keeps you going back for more? (How many shows do you do per year?)

I like the challenge— you never know what’s going to happen once you hit the road.  Weather, travel conditions, band dynamics, vehicle issues, traffic, and/or other events you compete against from town to town.  There are so many variables you just can’t worry about what might happen, but rather you train yourself to stay focused on what is. I’ve seen parts of the country I would have never seen, met people I would have never met, woven in and out of cultures I would have never experienced, and become aware of how different— yet how much alike we all really are.  I do most of my thinking when I’m driving. I work out song ideas in hotel rooms, take those riffs and different jams to the stage and see what kind of response I get from my band and from the audience.

I started touring in 1986 with a band on Arista records called Stealin’ Horses.  We played all over the USA, playing as many as 275 shows per year.  That was grueling!  I was with that band on and off from 1986 to 1990.  In 1991, I started the Kelly Richey band.  I built a local, then regional fan base, released my first record in 1994, and started touring nationally in 1997 with the release of my 4th CD “Eyes Of A Woman”.  For the next 13 years I toured all over the USA and Canada with several tours to Europe as well.  I averaged 200 plus shows per year.  In 2010, I took a much needed year-long break from touring and then returned to the road in 2011— averaging 100 plus shows that year.  I find recording albums and touring to go hand-in-hand, and both are a crucial component in my life as an artist.

Touring is hard and it takes it’s toll on musicians, but it’s the main way to get your music out there and it helps hone one’s skills. For me, touring is about hitting the stage and seeing what I’m made of: as a player, a person, and as an artist.  There are things you can’t know about yourself without putting yourself on the front line and going for it. Things happen when you tour… good and bad, easy and hard.  Some nights you play a great venue and the house is packed, other nights it’s not a great venue and only a few people are there.  You always have to do your best, and you have to be thick-skinned enough to weather whatever you’re faced with and still find a way to allow yourself to become vulnerable AND perform well when you hit the stage.

Touring is not for everyone, and I can honestly say that I’ve always found it to be hard and fairly unappealing in many respects; however, I LOVE to play and it’s the only way I know to get an entirely new audience each and every night of my life.  Each town and each situation is unique, and so are the individuals sitting in every seat.

Kelly Richey Riff Journal - TrueFire 2

What is the most difficult thing about touring these days? Have you seen anything change in touring over the years?

The landscape of music has drastically changed since I first started touring.  The club scene is not what it use to be, with the development of 500 cable stations, the internet bringing in so many affordable forms of entertainment into your living room, and artists’ of all stages of development having access to recording makes the airwaves and internet filled (if not saturated) with music, photos, sales pitches, stories and ads.  It takes a lot to get peoples’ attention nowadays, and I’m constantly reminded that the most important thing is to be real, be who you are, and share that with your audience.  You must remain relevant in today’s market, and you must give your audience a reason to connect with you because there are too many choices and people have to genuinely want to care and feel connected.

The hard costs of touring have doubled, and in some case tripled! Gas, hotels, vehicle maintenance, and food have all gone up— and pay is seldom guaranteed, but rather based on ticket sales.  Often people don’t realize that an artist can drive 20 hours to play a show and he or she may not make a dime.  If you run your own band then your are responsible for paying your band members no matter what. The hard core realities are intense, and impact an artists’ mental, physical and emotional ability to perform and maintain healthy relationships.  CD’s are becoming souvenirs, and though they still cost the same to make and to promote, people can get your music for almost free online or from their friends.  The artist has to be smarter today than ever before, and creativity often plays out more in survival mode than in “artistic mode” but again, this business is for the hardcore “fire in the belly” types and not so much for those with any sense of an altruistic point of view. Please do not take me wrong, music can and should be enjoyed and supported on all levels, but if you’re going to try to support yourself with it, it’s a very different animal and you need to be prepared for the realities.

As a teacher what do you think is the most important thing to help students with?

I think there are a few key elements that need to be explored; first, what are your students’ personal music goals?  Second, what is your students’ learning style?  And third, what natural abilities exist so you can teach to their weaknesses and help them leverage their strengths?

1) The teacher should never confuse their goals for the student with the goals they have for themselves.  Find out what your student  wants to learn and help them assess what it will take for them to do so.  This is critical because learning to play the guitar is quite different than “mastering” an instrument.  Some students seek mastery and other students just want to play and have fun— one is no more important or admirable than the other; however, it’s important to identify these goals and design an effective practice routine that helps every student to succeed.

2) Learning style is critical.  Some students need to know “why” so theory and structure are going to be a key component in their ability to learn.  Other students find theory to be intimidating— and even an obstacle to learning, so a good teacher will find creative ways to teach theory while they learn, instead of as a means to learning. These are two very different approaches and both equally important.  A teacher should be prepared to meet the learning style of each student in a way that keeps the student inspired and excited to learn.

3) Find out what your students strengths and weaknesses are.  Some students may have natural ability, but have had very few opportunities to learn or to play.  Get to know your student, see what things come naturally and what things will come solely through learning and developing a skill set that may not be intuitive. This also plays into helping students develop the proper practice routine, and find out what exposure they’ve had to music; as well as identifying their possible natural ability and they what they want to accomplish, and how fast. This is yet another reason to help students develop the appropriate practice routine.  I always have students “play to their strengths and practice to their weaknesses” to insure a healthy balance of fun while helping them to achieve the results desired.

Final thought:  people are really busy so I never underestimate the importance of defining for them where to place their focus and their time.  As a teacher for over three decades, I find this to be very important.

You write, record, tour and teach – is it ever difficult balancing all those things and making sure you are doing your best in each area?

Yes and no.  For me they all work hand in hand. You need an album to promote yourself, and you need to promote yourself in order to book gigs successfully, and you need to tour successfully to sell records. All that builds clout with students who want to learn to play and preform. Writing is something that comes in waves for most artists, but it’s the dedication to the craft of writing that equals the artists’ ability to generate a complete body of work.  It’s a massive amount of work to do this on a professional level, and there have been times when I couldn’t see how I was going to pull things off… but you learn to do the next thing, stay focused and don’t freak out!

I just released my 16th album, and honestly, with the release of each CD, it never gets easier!  When you’re in the middle of things it’s hard to see and maintain perspective.  I can play the guitar, that’s not at question; but can I book gigs? Can I maintain a good band? Can I write music and remain relevant?  Can I remain healthy and strong enough to meet the physical endurance and sheer cost of being on tour?  And when I teach, can I show up, fully present to support and inspire students to learn and be their best?

I learn as much from teaching as I ever did when I took lessons, and I get better at my song writing craft with each album that I record. Playing live on stage is a constant opportunity to learn and grow, and it’s also an opportunity to discover what you need to learn.  In short, it’s all a very organic process and you really must have the passion to pull it all off. I’ve done this non-stop since I was 15, with one short break in 2010 to get healthy, get 100% sober and redirect “my path” for sustainable success.  I can honestly say it’s worth it, but in the middle of a snow storm in North Dakota with the highways shut down and no Starbucks in sight, some days I question my choices!  ;>)

What are your plans for the next year?

I just released my 16th album “Shakedown Soul”, and I have six solo shows and six Kelly Richey Band shows between now and the end of February to support the release of my new CD.  I will be shooting my next TrueFire series in mid-January, and this series will be a “Focus On” what it takes to play guitar in a power trio.  I’m excited about this series, as I’ve been a guitarist in a power trio the majority of my career and it’s very different than working with another guitar player or touring with keys.  This past year was my first time only playing festivals and concerts with my band (no club gigs), and fully developing a solo show that would allow me to have the greatest flexibility to travel, write, and remain excited by all that I’m doing.  I played just 30 show with my band this past year— and we honestly had a blast!  It was my best year ever!  I played almost 50 solo shows and carved out an amazingly strong platform for taking the high energy of my guitar style to the stage all by myself.  I use a crazy setup with a boss RC300 looper, Native Instruments Maschine Studio for drum beats and loops, a stereo guitar amp that allows me to create a wall of sound that puts a smile on my face all night long and keeps me fresh and looking forward to the shows where I hit the stage with my band: Tobe “Tobotius” Donohue on drums, scratching and DJ work; and Rikk Manning, who is a bass beast!  Tobe and Rikk have supported me in taking my playing, writing, and performances to a whole new level. I’ve honestly never been so excited to be playing music, except for when I got my first guitar!

I have an excellent team around me now.  I have an amazing band, a fresh new sound that blends electronica, funk, hard rock and blues; I have a new record that represents the best work I’ve ever done, and I have Sonya Ziegler, my photographer, consultant, editor, artistic director, and voice of reason behind the scenes.  Sonya has been instrumental in helping me select material and is a solid sounding board for me when I song write. I’m already starting to get booked up for 2016 with band shows and solo shows, so I’m very excited to see what’s in store for all of us!

In combination with performing and recording, teaching is woven into most days of my life.  I’m either catching up with my TrueFire students in my classroom, teaching someone in my studio one-on-one, or delivering a Skype lesson to someone somewhere in the world.  Teaching guitar is a major passion of mine!  I have a three-part video series I developed in my home studio called “Blues On Steroids” and it’s a deep dive into my playing style that covers rhythm, lead, theory, and all the tips, tricks, and techniques I use.  I find that creating videos gives me an added ability to support the needs of students and meets all forms of learning styles.  In conjunction with teaching, I am also a writing facilitator for Women Writing for (a) Change; I do writing workshops and hold writing circles. And I run a non-profit organization called Music for Change.  I’m committed to help keep music and arts alive in our school system! You can find out more about M4C here– https://kellyrichey.com/m4c

You can read more about the making of the CD at the following link:
http://www.kellyricheymusic.com/if-you-wanna-rock/

Shakedown Soul - Cover square

CD SHORT DESCRIPTION:

“Shakedown Soul” is Kelly Richey’s 16th album in her 35 year career as a Master guitar slinger.  The album is an unprecedented mix of urban/indie in-your-face, raucous rock n roll, blues, funky bass grooves, and synthesized electronica— complete with DJ scratching and drum loops; with added elements like horns, strings, and synth sequencing that combine to make “Shakedown Soul” a one-of-kind, phenomenal sonic wall of sound that will have you foot stomping and head banging one minute and completely mesmerized the next.  Richey’s husky alto vocals and raw, ultra personal songwriting will leave you introspective, speechless and wanting more. Her guitar work on this album is truly exceptional— the songs retain her signature Strat sound, but Richey steps out of the box to incorporate new melodies and synthesized guitar sounds that sit perfectly within the concept of the album.

“Shakedown Soul” is a studio album superbly mixed and mastered by Tobe “Tobotius” Donohue and features a group of extraordinary musicians and back scene talent all collaborating to make the finest piece of work that Richey has done to date.  All the songs are original, and feature Richey on guitar and vocals, Rikk Manning on bass, and Tobe Donohoe on drums, scratching and synths. In “You Wanna Rock” and “Love” you can hear some of Richey’s early influences from bands like Led Zeppelin, Free, and Bad Company.  The song “Lies” is influenced by Sheryl Crow’s self titled album, and the tracks “Afraid To Die” and “The Artist In Me” are haunting tunes that reflect the influence producer Daniel Lanois and artist Emmy Lou Harris’s “Wrecking Ball” album had on her.  Add to that list “Just like A River” and you have three songs taken from Richey’s poetry and reflect her influence for artist Patti Smith— while musically being influenced from bands like the Smithereens and early Chrissy Hinds of the Pretenders.  “I Want To Run” draws on straight forward power chords and powerful riffs that pull from influences like Lenny Kravitz. “Only Going Up” and “I Want To Run” is where you’ll find a classic example of where rock and roll and electronica meet face to face! Richey approached the writing and recording from a strip-downed perspective, writing the majority of this material to both rock and hip-hop drum loops.  Heavily influenced by the work of early Black Keys, Jack White and Led Zeppelin, Richey handed her songs to Tobe to “do his thing”.  Richey said to Tobe and Rikk, “You make me cool and you make me relevant and I’ll make you rock!”  Indeed she did! Tobe brings his unique bend of heavy funk, electronica, D.J. production to each song, and Rikk manning completes the groove with his spectacular bass playing.

Never one to rest on her laurels, Richey has crafted her finest album to date, featuring ten stellar songs that are guaranteed to blow you away whether you are an old fan or new.  Be prepared for an astonishing, intense sonic experience that will leave you with your jaw on the ground!

News & Updates

News & Updates: Kelly Richey Solo & The Kelly Richey Band

I just returned from a two-week tour that took me through Tennessee, Florida, and Georgia.  The tour kicked off with solo shows just outside of Nashville, Tennessee, and then on down into Pensacola Beach, Florida.  After that, I taped the TrueFire shoot at the TrueFire studio in St. Petersburg for my next guitar instruction video “Focus On: Power Trio”, and on the way home we met the band for shows in the greater Knoxville area just outside of Atlanta, Georgia.

On the way to my third show in Bradenton, Florida, my “old faithful” Dodge Sprinter tour van decided to take a broken-down permanent rest 95 miles from our destination. Transmission went out suddenly with no warning. Thankfully with Triple A Plus you get 100 miles of free towing—  and that’s exactly how I arrived in Sarasota, Florida for my show the following night at Ace’s Music venue!  We want to personally thank our dear friends Hugh and Christa Graham for their kindness and generosity in helping us logistically transfer gear, feed us, and put us up in their home while all this madness was going on… thank you so much!

While in St. Petersberg, Florida for the TrueFire shoot, I was purchased a new Dodge ProMaster City to use for solo shows while the “beast” is currently being repaired for the band shows during festival season.  I’ll have to fly back to sunny Florida to get the van, but with 8 degree weather here in Cincinnati, I’m not too worried about working that mission into my schedule ;>)

Here’s a list of what’s upcoming shows and appearances by Kelly Richey:

Thursday, January 21st, 2016:
Arts in Education program at Batesville Middle School
Kelly Richey will conduct three music programs, four songwriting workshops and put on a special live performance at the school that’s open to the public from 7pm to 8pm.

Saturday, January 23rd, 2016:
WNKU – Kelly Richey as Guest DJ w/ Ken Hanes
Roadhouse Blues Show 10pm til Midnight

Saturday, February 6th, 2016:
Cincy Blues Winter Blues Fest – 11pm
The Phoenix in Downtown Cincinnati, OH

Check out the awesome photos Sonya Ziegler took while we traveled, and check out Tobe Donohue and Rikk Manning killing it on the new material from “Shakedown Soul”!

Kelly Richey Band at Barley's - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Tobe Donohue and Rikk Manning w/ The Kelly Richey Band at Barley’s in Maryville, TNKelly Richey Band at Barley's - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey w/ The Kelly Richey Band at Barley’s in Maryville, TN Kelly Richey Band at Barley's - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Tobe Donohue w/ The Kelly Richey Band at Barley’s in Maryville, TN Kelly Richey Band at Barley's - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Rikk Manning w/ The Kelly Richey Band at Barley’s in Maryville, TN

Kelly Richey Band at Crossroads - photo by Sonya Ziegle

Kelly Richey, Tobe Donohue and Rikk Manning – The Kelly Richey Band at Crossroads in Peachtree City, GA

Kelly Richey at Aces Music - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey at Paradise in Aces Music in Bradenton, FL

Kelly Richey at Aces Music - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey at Paradise in Aces Music in Bradenton, FL

Kelly Richey at Paradise Bar - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey at Paradise in Pensacola Beach, FL

Kelly Richey at Paradise Bar - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey at Paradise in Pensacola Beach, FL

Kelly Richey at Kimbros - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey at Paradise in Kimbro’s in Franklin, TN

Kelly Richey at Kimbros - photo by Sonya Ziegler

Kelly Richey at Paradise in Kimbro’s in Franklin, TN

Blues guitarist will mentor students

Blues guitarist will mentor students, then perform publicly:
Batesville Herald Tribune
Wednesday, January 13, 2016 5:33 pm

The Arts in Education program at Batesville Middle School, partially funded by the Rural Alliance for the Arts, welcomes guitarist Kelly Richey Thursday, Jan. 21, for a day of guitar clinics and songwriting, reports BMS general music teacher Leon Enneking. A free evening program open to the public also is slated for Jan. 21 from 7-8 p.m. in the BMS commons. Richey will perform some of her solo works and will discuss the blues. This RAA Evening Concert Series event is funded by the nonprofit.

According to a news release, “She is one of the hardest-working independent musicians out there, and has been teaching guitar almost as long as she’s been playing. With over three decades of teaching experience under her belt, she is a deeply dedicated and inspirational guitar instructor who has taught well over 1,000 students to date.”

Richey has a rock solid understanding of blues guitar techniques, which she passionately passes on to her students. She’s a warm, outgoing and dynamic guitar instructor with a unique teaching style who relates exceptionally well to her students no matter what their skill level or background may be. Richey is an avid writer. Although suffering from dyslexia since childhood, she has developed ways to get around this debilitating problem and has kept extensive handwritten journals since her teens. In 2012 Kelly released the poetry book “Whisperings – A Collection Of Poems From Blues Guitarist Kelly Richey.” Her 89 poems deal with finding one’s true self, relationship struggles, emotional turmoil, the ups and downs of life, vulnerability, survivorship, spirituality, love, lost love, heartache, longing and passion.

KellyRicheyPromo_PhotobyAlisonHasbach_5 copy

Blues guitarist will mentor students, then perform publicly:

Born in Lexington, Kentucky, but now based in Cincinnati, Kelly Richey started playing guitar at the age of 15. Today, a staggering 3,900 gigs later, she more than earns the title of master guitarist and singer/songwriter.